Proclamation for Queen Elizabeth II

EADT – Saturday, 9th February 1952.
EAST ANGLIANS CHEER NEW QUEEN ELIZABETH
TOWNSFOLK HEAR READING OF PROCLAMATION
The ancient townships of East Anglia, themselves monuments of English history, yesterday echoed with cheers and fanfares for the new Queen Elizabeth after ceremonial readings of the Proclamation of the Accession.
Big crowds, paying ne heed to the bitter North wind, watched the civic heads in their traditional garb and the accompanying military contingents. At 10 a.m. as the Mayor began to read from the Proclamation:” Where as it hath pleased Almighty God —–” the Union Jack flying at half-mast from rooftops was hoisted to the topmast. For six hours it will remain so.
Flags, which had been at half-mast, were hoisted to masthead after the readings of the Proclamation had been completed. They remained thus until sunset, and to-day will be at half-mast once again.
Previously onlookers had stood in silent tribute to King George VI., and in Courts of Law and at public meetings business was stayed for a few moments while people stood in honour of the dead Monarch.
Light snow showers fell as crowds assembled before Ipswich Town Hall to hear the Mayor, Alderman A.J. Colthorpe.
Service chiefs in Suffolk county and local civic officials and clergy were present with contingents of Army, Navy and Air Force personnel and a band of Royal Marines.
THREE CHEERS FOR THE QUEEN!
At the end of the text the service contingents were ordered “Hats off!” and three cheers were called for Her Majesty the Queen.
A hush fell and then the contingents, marching to “Soldiers of the Queen,” left the Cornhill to be dismissed in King Street.
GOD SAVE OUR QUEEN
The scene on Ipswich Cornhill yesterday as “God Save The Queen” followed the reading of the Proclamation by the Mayor, Alderman A.J. Colthorpe.
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